infojocks-tosu

Infojocks Sports Graphics

I love sports. I love designs. I lust infographics. What could be better than an awesomely designed poster that beautifully and nerdily displays detailed sports statistics? Designer Jeremy Yingling creates and sells great looking posters and prints that illustrate sports history through various types of data visualization techniques. The logo is great too. Definitely a Ohio/Pennsylvania area bias right now (Jeremy is an Ohio U grad), but hopefully Infojocks will add some Texas stuff so I have an excuse to give him some money.

content-choreograpny

Content Choreography – Content Strategy in a Responsive World

Trent Walton has written (and designed) a great (and beautiful) article on dealing with content in responsive web designs that adapt to the width of visitors’ browsers. Content Choreography is a good discussion of content organization, changing designs too much between various widths, and the workflow needed when creating responsive web sites. Definitely a must read for any designer or developer.

Screen Resolution != Browser Window

Something I’ve been preaching for years, but just because your web analytics say everyone visiting your site has as screen resolution of 4,000 pixels by 4,000 pixels doesn’t actually mean their browser is that size. Screen resolution size is not the same as browser window size. Most users, including myself, surf the web with their browser window at only a fraction of their screen resolution.

Mac vs. PC Infographic

Great looking, amusing infographic from the Hunch blog comparing survey answers of Mac users to PC users. Don’t read the comments on that post if you want to continue thinking humanity has a chance.

Does Your Facebook Page Work for Secure Users?

Facebook added the ability for users to browse using a secure connection (or https connection) back in January, but unless you were reading their blog or Mashable most users probably didn’t notice. This important feature secures the communication between your browser and Facebook’s servers as you browse the site, closing a gaping security hole that allowed anyone to easily hijack your session and pretend to be you while sitting at the coffee shop. Previously you had to dig deep into account settings to find and turn on https browsing, but recently Facebook has been promoting this feature with a large message on users’ news feeds.

This additional promotion means that more and more Facebook users will turn this setting on for their accounts. Great news… isn’t it?

Of course, better security for users is great but this change could completely break parts of your business’ Facebook page. Facebook tabs or applications that contain unsecure (non-https) content will not display to these users, and instead a large error message displays. The message gives them the option to temporarily disable secure browsing (that certainly sounds ominous) or else they can’t see this content.

Depending on what part of your page is causing the issue, the fix could be as easy as changing or adding one setting and loading an SSL certificate to the site where you’re hosting your app or external content (if you don’t already have one).

You’ve put a ton of effort into using social media as a marketing tool for your business, now make sure to take five minutes to change that setting and test your page to make sure all your fans actually get to see it.